Travel Insurance Missed Flight

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Missed Departure Travel Insurance

Have you ever missed a flight?

There are few things more stressful, and the frustration is only worsened when it's matters outside of your control that cause you to miss your departure.

According to one study, a surprising 3 in 5 people have missed or been late for a flight - with 39% citing traffic and public transport delays as the cause*.

How can your travel insurance policy help with this all-too common issue and how can you successfully claim for missed flight insurance?

(Before you go ahead and delve into this article, we should probably clear up one thing. If you're here because you overslept, you'll find it's nigh on impossible to get cover, where the fault is your own for missing the departure time. If this isn't the case, then read on to find out how you can get the most out of your missed flight insurance cover.)

What am I covered for?

With missed departure insurance, you are covered for any extra expenses incurred directly as a result of missing your flight. The usual expenses that you are covered for include things like extra accommodation and transportation costs. Remember, the exact amount you can claim for a missed flight will depend on the insurer and the level of cover you have selected.

Holiday Extras missed flight insurance provides up to £400 cover for countries outside the UK and up to £100 for countries inside the UK.

Claiming for a missed flight

The first step towards making a successful claim is to provide valid reasons for missing your flight. But what sort of reasons are considered valid for claiming missed flight insurance..?

Below is a list of reasons that insurers are likely to accept when considering a claim for missed departure:

  • Public transport failing to run to its scheduled timetable
  • The vehicle you are travelling in having an accident or breaking down
  • An accident or breakdown occurring ahead of you on a motorway or dual carriage way causing an unexpected delay to the vehicle you are travelling in.
  • Delays caused by adverse weather conditions resulting in you missing the outgoing flight in your home country.

In each of the situations listed, it is matters outside of the travellers control that causes them to miss their flight. Under these sorts of circumstances, a claim is highly likely to be considered.

As well as providing a valid reason for missing your flight, you will also have to provide some supporting evidence for your claim.

Supporting Evidence

Examples of good supporting evidence

  • Photographic evidence - If you are involved in a road accident, take pictures of the scene, including indications of weather conditions and any relevant road warning signs. If you missed the flight due to public transport delays, be sure to get pictures of the display board times and any notices of delayed services as proof.
  • Eye witness accounts - It's a smart move to get the contact details of others involved in the incident - testimonies from eye witnesses can do a lot to strengthen a claim.
  • Documentation - travel tickets, route itineraries and receipts all make valid evidence, so it's wise to hang onto these.

As you scanned through the above list, you may have come to a dry realisation of how wonderful a thing hindsight is. If you need to make a claim, but didn't think to take photographic evidence or details for eyewitness accounts, don't worry - all is not lost.

How to get delay verification

The most important piece of evidence you can get is some form of verification confirming the road incident or delayed service. Without this, most insurers won't even consider your claim. Luckily, this type of evidence is usually quite straightforward to obtain, even some time after the event. Here's how you can go about getting verification of a road incident or delayed service...

Delayed public transport service

While some aspects of the process may differ slightly depending on the transport provider, the country and the region in which you were travelling, the basic method of getting confirmation for a delayed service remains largely the same.

The first thing to do is to check the website of the transport provider for a delay verification form. Some transport providers have a page dedicated to dealing with delay verification requests, with a form you can fill out online.

Granted, not all transport providers have such an obvious way of obtaining delay verification. If this is the case, you shouldn't be put off from pursuing your confirmation - it's just a simple matter of e-mailing the customer relations department.

Here are a few simple things you can bear in mind when sending an e-mail request for delay verification:


  • Make it clear that all you want is confirmation of the delay.
  • Be very specific about the date and time of the event, together with any relevant details as to why the service was delayed.
  • Where applicable, provide a link to a news item or delay incident report.

Usually, if you make it clear that you aren't trying to get compensation, transport providers will be cooperative in giving you delay verification.

Road incidents and traffic delays

If you missed your flight because of a road incident, getting proof of the event is similar to the steps listed above. The Department of Transport and the Highway Agency keep a record of all motorway related incidents, so contacting these bodies is a surefire way to getting delay verification.

Alternatively, if it was your vehicle that was directly involved in the incident, you can also get confirmation of the event by contacting the breakdown service that dealt with the situation.


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*The study was conducted by KABBEE. View full press release here.

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